House Rules

House Rules by Glistam__

Character Creation:

1. Stat rolls

Characters playing a human roll for their 8 attributes using the rules as presented in Robotech.

Bionic strength (whether due to partial or full bionics) no longer has a cap, and uses the Robotic Strength rules. The Bionic/Augmented strength tables are now solely for enhanced humanoids, such as Juicers, Crazies, Dog Boys’s, etcetera.

2. Skills

Once you have determined all your skills at character generation, add together all the levelling bonuses from each skill (ie, the +5% per level or +3% per level information). When your character levels up, take these points and use them as a “pool”, distributing amongst your skills as appropriate. The maximum points any skill can receive is equal to your IQ score (not bonus, the score itself). Once a skill reaches 98% remove the “per level” bonus increase from the “pool” for future levels.

In certain situations some skills can be attempted even if the character does not normally have the appropriate skill. In those situations the character rolls percentile against an appropriate attribute in order to determine success or failure. If the character posesses a skill which provides a bonus to the skill being attempted then that bonus will apply.

Sometimes, the use of a skill can be considered an automatic success. This is on a case-by-case basis and generally will be because the following conditions are met. There may be other requirements as determined on a situational basis.
-The penalties to the use of the skill do not exceed the skill percentage (resulting in a negative skill percentage to succeed)
-The character takes at least twice as long (or longer) as usual to perform the skill as based on his or her final calculated skill percentage – actual time multiplier will be based on final calculated skill percentage and situation – never less than x2, however.

Combat:

1. Attacks vs Actions. “Attacks” and “Actions” are the same thing as far as your “Attacks per melee” are concerned. 1 action uses up 1 attack.

2. Phases

Each melee round is divided into three “phases”, each of which is 5 seconds. Attacks per melee are broken up between phases as noted in #3, below. Initiative is rolled at the start of the melee round and not rolled again until the next melee round.

If you have more than one attack available in a phase, you may use them in succession during your turn on initiative order.

Your speed dictates how far you can move during one phase.
-Speed times 2 is the number of feet you can move in one phase.
-To run faster uses up all your melee actions that phase and cannot be done if you do not have all your attacks available that phase. The maximum distance you can run in one phase is equal to your speed times 5.

3. Attacks per melee round

Each melee round is divided into three “phases” of 5 second duration each. Characters take their “attacks per melee” and divide by three, allocating the result across all three phases. If there are attacks remaining they are assigned as follows: If there is one attack remaining it occurs in the last phase. If there are two attacks left over they occur in the second and third phase.

Examples:
1 attack per melee – Your combat inexperience means you spend two phases doing no attacks. Each melee you may choose which phase to use your one attack in. You may still move up to 2x your speed in the other phases as normal.
2 attack per melee – Your combat inexperience means you spend one phase doing no attacks. Each melee you may choose which two phases to use your two attacks in. You may still move up to 2x your speed in the other phase as normal.
3 attacks per melee – 1 attack in phase 1, 1 attack in phase 2, 1 attack in phase 3.
4 attacks per melee – 1 attack in phase 1, 1 attack in phase 2, 2 attacks in phase 3.
5 attacks per melee – 1 attack in phase 1, 2 attacks in phase 2, 2 attacks in phase 3.
6 attacks per melee – 2 attacks in phase 1, 2 attacks in phase 2, 2 attacks in phase 3.
7 attacks per melee – 2 attacks in phase 1, 2 attacks in phase 2, 3 attacks in phase 3.
Etcetera ad infinitum

4. Dodging

If the character is free to move (unrestrained) then an attempt to dodge may be made. A dodge can be attempted against any type of attack the character is aware of, including gunfire. There are no penalties for dodging different types of attacks except as may be indicated in the attack itself.

Deciding to dodge as a reaction to an opponent’s attack uses up 1 of your next attacks. You must declare your intent to dodge before the attack roll is made. Your dodge roll is your dodge against all attacks made against you until your next turn (even if you have more attacks usable that turn). If you have no attacks available on your next turn you may still dodge as indicated above – there will be no additional penalty regarding future loss of attacks (thus, a character with 1 attack per melee who has already used his attack in phase 1 will still be able to dodge if attacked after his turn in phase 1, during phase 2 or before his turn in phase 3. If attacked after his turn in phase 3 then he will have an attack available from the next melee round and his dodge will cost him that action/attack, as usual).

You may use one of your attacks during your turn to declare your intent to dodge any attacks which you become aware of – resolve this dodge as normal once you are attacked (or decide you need to dodge) except no additional attacks will be used up.

5. Auto-Dodge
_ Pending Changes 12-11-13_
Auto-dodge allows you to dodge without using up as many melee attacks. You use your entire dodge bonus when auto-dodging and disregard any notion of a separate bonus specifically for auto-dodge. There are no penalties for auto-dodging different types of attacks except as may be indicated in the attack itself.

If the character is free to move (unrestrained) and has the listed ability to auto-dodge, then an attempt to auto-dodge may be made. An auto-dodge can be attempted against any type of attack the character is aware of, including gunfire. There are no penalties for auto-dodging different types of attacks.

Deciding to auto-dodge as a reaction to one of an opponent’s attacks does not use up an attack. Your roll to auto-dodge is only usable against the one, specific attack that prompted your reaction. Additional attacks against you before your next turn must be auto-dodged individually, and all additional auto-dodges will use up only your next attack. Not having an attack available on your next turn is resolved the same way as for Dodge, listed previously.

You may use one of your attacks during your turn to declare your intent to auto-dodge against attacks which you become aware of – you will be able to auto-dodge individual attacks you are aware of until your next phase without using up additional attacks per melee.

6. Parrying

If the character’s arms are free to move (unrestrained) and the character has an appropriate item then an attempt to parry may be made. The item used to parry must be appropriate against the attack being used (a dagger can parry another dagger or sword; a dagger cannot parry a bullet or energy beam). A parry attempt can be made against any type of attack the character is aware of. There are no penalties for parrying different types of attacks except as may be indicated in the attack itself.

Deciding to parry as a reaction to one of an opponent’s attacks does not use up an attack. Your roll to parry is only usable against the one, specific attack that prompted your reaction. You may parry one attack with a suitable weapon/item you have without using up any attacks per melee. Additional attacks that phase must be parried individually, and all additional parry attempts will use only your next available attack. Not having an attack available on your next turn is resolved the same way as for Dodge, listed previously.

You may use one of your attacks during your turn to declare your intent to parry any attacks you become aware of – you will be able to parry individual attacks you are aware of until your next phase without using up additional attacks per melee.

7. Ranged Weapon Combat
_ Pending Changes 12-11-13_
Almost all Projectile, Laser and Ion weapons support “Aimed, Burst, Wild” fire rules regardless of what the weapon description states – if this doesn’t make sense for the weapon or can lead to an abusable situation consult with the GM to verify.

Aimed: Each individual shot fired takes one melee attack. Characters can not make a normal aimed attack if they move during a phase or if they just dodged last action. You may make more than 1 aimed attack in a phase if you have more than 1 attack available in that phase. Characters with a Weapon Proficiency in the weapon they are using enjoy a +3 to hit, plus an additional +1 for every 3 levels, as per original WP Modern skills. Characters without a weapon proficiency get no bonus and suffer no penalty to aimed attacks.

Burst: A series of shots is fired, one after the other repeatedly. Bursting with a weapon is slightly different depending on the weapon being used; most weapons capable of bursting will fall into one of the three categories below:

A. Bursting with semi-automatic and automatic weapons. These rules apply to all semi-automatic and automatic weapons (but not machine or rail guns). Weapons with a “pulse” feature may still fire pulse shots as indicated but pulse blasts cannot be used to burst also. Weapons with a listed “burst” feature may still fire that burst as listed, or use the rules below. Characters can not make a normal burst attack if they move during a phase or if they just dodged last action (see “Shooting Wild”, later). You may make more than 1 burst attack in a phase if you have more than 1 attack available in that phase, within the limits described below. Characters with a Weapon Proficiency in the weapon they are using enjoy a +1 to hit, plus an additional +1 for every 3 levels, as per original WP Modern skills. Characters without a weapon proficiency are considered to be shooting wild and suffer the appropriate penalty (-6). If there are other target(s) in line with the original target and in range of the attacker, there is a 10% chance of those target(s) being hit by 1 shot.

-Short Burst: Uses up 20% of your weapon’s total ammunition capacity (not based on current ammo) – always a minimum of two shots, however. A fully loaded weapon should generally be able to make as many as 5 short bursts before running out of ammo. Damage is equal to one normal shot x2. Uses one attack.
-Long Burst: Uses up 50% of your weapon’s total ammunition capacity (not based on current ammo). A fully loaded weapon should be able to make 2 long bursts before running out of ammo. Damage is equal to one normal shot x5. Uses two attacks.
-Emptying the magazine: This is done by doing repeated long bursts and is no longer a separate action.

B. Bursting with machine guns. The following burst rules only apply to machine guns (regardless of SDC or MDC capable ammunition). Weapons with a listed “burst” feature may still fire that burst as listed, or use the rules below. If there are other target(s) in line with the original target and in range of the attacker, there is a 25% chance of those target(s) being hit by 1 shot. All other burst rules apply as listed previously.

-Short Burst: Uses up 10% of your weapon’s total ammunition capacity (not based on current ammo). A fully loaded machine gun should be able to make 10 short bursts before running out of ammo. Damage is equal to one normal shot x3. Uses one attack.
-Long Burst: Uses up 30% of your weapon’s total ammunition capacity (not based on current ammo). A fully loaded weapon should be able to make 3 long bursts and only have enough ammo left for 1 short burst. Damage is equal to one normal shot x8. Uses two attacks.
-Emptying the magazine: This is done by doing repeated long bursts and is no longer a separate action.

C. Bursting with rail guns. The following burst rules apply to rail guns (EXCEPT the Boom Gun, however, which continues to follow its own rules as listed in the book and does not follow the burst rules outlined here).Weapons with a listed “burst” feature may still fire that burst as listed, or use the rules below. If there are other target(s) in line with the original target and in range of the attacker, there is a 25% chance of those target(s) being hit by 1 shot. All other burst rules apply as listed previously.

-Short Burst: This is the listed “burst” under the weapon description. No change. Uses one melee attack.
-Long Burst: Fires 3x the number of shots as the Short Burst and does 2x the listed burst damage. Uses two attacks.
-Emptying the magazine: This is done by doing repeated long bursts and is no longer a separate action.

Wild: Shooting wild occurs under various conditions. Shooting wild imposes a -6 penalty for each condition which applies. Characters with the appropriate weapon proficiency (W.P.) ignore the first -6 penalty only.
-Shooting without being able to see the target, but having an idea of where they are.
-Shooting during a phase in which the character is moving. If shooting a burst, increase the chance of additional targets hit to 25% (50% for rail or machine gun bursts)
-Shooting a burst when you do not have a weapon proficiency in that weapon.

-Spray an Area: Can only be done with a long burst. All targets in the area can decide to dodge or parry as normal. Roll one attack to hit the entire area. Each target not behind cover or failing to successfully defend (dodge or parry) will take single shot damage (single shot x2 damage if with a rail gun)
-Additional situations as necessary or as seems “right”

8. Magic

Casting Times: Casting magic spells uses Rifts: Ultimate Edition rules regarding how many attacks a spell takes to cast. Higher level spells may likely take more than 1 phase to cast. Parrying, dodging, or other defensive actions during spell casting will cancel the spell, as will taking enough damage to be knocked down.
-Spell levels 1-5 require 1 melee attack to cast
-Spell levels 6-10 require 2 melee attacks to cast
-Spells level 11 and higher require 3 melee attacks to cast

Armor: Wearing metal body armor does not affect the spell or spell caster in any additional way.

Spell Strength: A caster’s spell strength is added to the save versus ritual spells as well as the save versus invocations.

9. Psionics

Major Psychic: Rolling a character as having “Major Psionics” during Step 4 of character creation (RUE, p. 289) will force that character to forfeit half of the “Other” skills made available by the character’s OCC/RCC. If the player doesn’t wish to forfeit the required skills then they may select “Minor Psionics” or “Not psychic” as they feel is appropriate.

10. Taking Damage

SDC Characters in Body Armor take SDC damage from certain attacks as follows.
-Falling/Knockback: 1D6 SDC per 20 feet of distance. A distance of 100 feet or more will knock out the character for 1D6 melee rounds unless the roll versus fall or impact is successfully made.
-Whenever the armor takes damage from physical attacks or explosives: 1 SDC per 10 MDC inflicted.

Characters who suffer 5 or more mega-damage from a physical attack or explosion may have a chance to be knocked down. The percentile chance of this occuring is equal to twice the damage done. For example, 22 MD would be a 44 percent chance to be knocked down. If the percentile indicates a knock down the character may roll to maintain balance (if the character possesses that skill) and avoid being knocked down. Being knocked down makes the character lose their next attack. Getting back up from being knocked down counts as “moving” a number of feet equal to your speed during a combat phase.